You are here:HomeIssuesHealth Care Reform2017Support for GOP Healthcare Bill Collapses

Support for GOP Healthcare Bill Collapses

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced he has abandoned the bill to repeal and replace Obamacare and said the chamber will now vote on a straight repeal—with a two-year delay—a plan that likely faces even steeper hurdles than the ill-fated replacement bill...
July 18, 2017

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced he has abandoned the bill to repeal and replace Obamacare and said the chamber will now vote on a straight repeal—with a two-year delay—a plan that likely faces even steeper hurdles than the ill-fated replacement bill.

Support for the GOP’s revised bill collapsed when two additional Republicans—Mike Lee of Utah and Jerry Moran of Kansas—joined fellow GOP Senators Rand Paul of Kentucky and Susan Collins of Maine and announced they would vote against the measure.

A close vote had already been predicted prior to the additional defections. With the GOP holding a 52-48 majority in the Senate, they can afford to lose only two Republicans. If they can muster 50 votes, Vice President Mike Pence can break a tie for final passage.

READ: Trump Suggests Republicans Will Let ACA Market Collapse

Some GOP senators have been talking about a new approach to health legislation, with Lindsey Graham of South Carolina tweeting again about his latest proposal with Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy to keep most of the Affordable Care Act’s taxes in place but give states far more freedom on what to do with the money.

Already, Collins and Sens. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) announced they will vote against a stand-alone repeal.

McConnell spoke of the potential of moving to a scaled-back, bipartisan version of health legislation last month when an earlier version of a GOP-only bill collapsed because it lacked enough support. Some observers say a defeat of a stand-alone repeal may be part of a plan by a Republican leadership team that has expressed a desire to begin moving on to other matters.

[from Bloomberg reports]

Filed under: