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Active Hurricane Season So Far, But Most Storms Don't Hit the U.S.

Forecasters correctly predicted an active Atlantic hurricane season for this year, but most of the storms that developed did not reach the coast of the...
October 13, 2010

Forecasters correctly predicted an active Atlantic hurricane season for this year, but most of the storms that developed did not reach the coast of the U.S. Since the season began on June 1, only two of the 15 named storms, Bonnie and Julia, have made landfall in the U.S. and neither resulted in catastrophic damage.

It's a multibillion-dollar relief for insurers and property owners, especially after the hurricane forecast team at Colorado State University predicted a 69 percent chance that a major hurricane would hit the United States, up from 52 percent in a typical year - raising fears that the season would repeat the devastation of 2005, which brought Katrina and Rita. Those chances get slimmer by the day as the peak hurricane season, which started in mid-August, comes to an end in mid-October. The hurricane season overall officially starts June 1 and ends Nov. 30.

"It's been a very active season, including some very intense storms," said Robert Hartwig, president of the Insurance Information Institute. "The reality is they simply didn't make landfall in the U.S. and unambiguously, that is favorable for property/casualty insurers and people who didn't have claims." The National Hurricane Center predicted 14 to 20 named storms for this year, including eight to 12 hurricanes, with four to six major hurricanes of category 3 or stronger. As of October 6, 15 named storms and seven hurricanes have appeared, with five having developed into major hurricanes.

Click here to read Hurricane Season a Swing and a Miss (Hartford Courant 10/6/10)

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