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This Year's Hurricane Season Could Be Worse than 2005's

Using new tools for measuring ground, water and atmospheric cycles as the basis for forecasting major storms, leading scientists are predicting an extremely high level...
July 13, 2010

Using new tools for measuring ground, water and atmospheric cycles as the basis for forecasting major storms, leading scientists are predicting an extremely high level of hurricane activity in 2010.

All indicators point to a 2010 hurricane season "at or beyond" record levels, reports Greg Holland of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colo., a research facility supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF).  To date, the 2005 season, with 28 major storms, according to NOAA records, was the most active on record.

Years of research and observations combined with advances in computer modeling, have led scientists to project a 2010 hurricane season that could be so intense that it could surpass the record set in 2005. Recent conditions and climate change are among factors that have resulted in predictions of increasing storm intensity in the next decades. Although the forecasts are cause for concern, those who will be affected by increased storm activity, including the responders to the current oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and insurance companies, now have better tools for use in preparing for and managing risks.

Hurricane Modeling Predicts Rough 2010 (U.S. News & World Report 7/8/10)

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