You are here:HomeIssuesNatural Disaster2011NOAA Revises Hurricane Season Outlook Slightly Upward

NOAA Revises Hurricane Season Outlook Slightly Upward

On August 4 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) made a slight revision to its May hurricane outlook, which predicted 14 to 18 named...
August 9, 2011

On August 4 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) made a slight revision to its May hurricane outlook, which predicted 14 to 18 named tropical storms for the current season. The forecasters said that exceptionally high ocean temperatures and atmospheric conditions are likely to produce a storm season that is higher than average and predict 14 to 19 named tropical storms, including the five tropical storms that have already formed since the season began on June 1. The period of greatest hurricane activity is from August through October.

Last week, Tropical Storm Emily dumped heavy rains on Puerto Rico and then broke up after running into the mountainous terrain of Haiti. PIA of Puerto Rico National Director Jose Ortiz said, "We managed alright. We had almost 13 inches of rain in the Eastern part of the island and about six inches in San Juan, where our executive vice president Marcos Genemaras and I live. The agricultural sector suffered the most and several bridges collapsed due to the water surges."

Gerry Bell, lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center in Washington, said considerable activity is expected and warned coastal residents not to be complacent, urging them to be prepared for hurricanes.

Filed under: