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Rare “Land Hurricane” Cuts Path of Destruction from Midwest to East

A series of severe storms blew through several eastern states on June 29-30, causing the deaths of at least 22 people and disrupting electricity for at least 4.3 million people
July 10, 2012

A series of severe storms blew through several eastern states on June 29-30, causing the deaths of at least 22 people and disrupting electricity for at least 4.3 million people. AccuWeather attributes the damaging system to a derecho, or gigantic wind storms coupled with thunderstorms that are as powerful as tornadoes but do not twist. Derechos are described as land hurricanes because they have wind gusts of at least 58 miles per hour and higher. But unlike tropical hurricanes, with a derecho there is no warning.

The weather event started outside Chicago as a cluster of thunderstorms, says the Weather Channel. The bad weather plowed south and east, hitting Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland, the District of Columbia and New Jersey. The Insurance Information Institute issued a FAQ regarding coverage issues related to the derecho.

Read III's FAQ on "derechos": Insurance Questions from Mid-Atlantic Natural Disaster (I.I.I. 7/3/12)

Read an entire on the recent Mid-Atlantic storms: Derecho-related Claims Pouring In (Insurance Journal 7/6/12)

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