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Disgraced Ex-Gov. Spitzer Denies He's Eyeing a Comeback

Disgraced former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer has denied a recent report in The New York Post that he's been privately talking with friends about...
September 9, 2009

Disgraced former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer has denied a recent report in The New York Post that he's been privately talking with friends about a possible comeback and is considering a run for statewide office next year. "I have no plans to run for office," Spitzer told the newspaper in a brief telephone interview from his father's Manhattan real estate office.

Spitzer resigned from office in March 2008 after it was revealed that he was a client of a high-priced Manhattan prostitution ring. After keeping a low profile for months, Spitzer has slowly re-emerged into the public eye. He's begun writing an online column, is granting more radio and television interviews and will soon begin teaching a class at City College of New York.

Beginning in 2004, Spitzer conducted a campaign against the ability of insurance agents and brokers to receive contingent commissions. After a series of investigations of what Spitzer called bid-rigging and client-steering allegations against a handful of insurers and mega-brokers, settlement agreements were negotiated. Some called for outright bans on the payment of contingent commissions, while others proscribed a disclosure regime. But instead of being applied just to those suspected of wrongdoing, these agreements were applied to all Main Street agents in all jurisdictions nationwide. But Main Street independent agents - who were never under any suspicion and did not do anything wrong - got caught up in the ban.

On September 15, 2006, PIA National filed an amicus brief in the U.S. District Court for New Jersey, opposing one of the proposed settlements. Subsequent court decisions over the next two years affirmed that contingent commissions are not illegal. PIA also opposed a flawed mandatory commission disclosure model law that passed at the NAIC on a divided vote. No state adopted it.

Spitzer Denies He's Running for Office (NY Post 9/1/09)