You are here:HomeNews CenterInsurance News2013PIA-Backed NCOIL Model Bill Moving Through State Legislatures

PIA-Backed NCOIL Model Bill Moving Through State Legislatures

A little more than two months after it was adopted unanimously by the National Conference of Insurance Legislators (NCOIL), a PIA-backed model bill regulating certificates of insurance is now seeing action in at least seven states...
February 5, 2013

A little more than two months after it was adopted unanimously by the National Conference of Insurance Legislators (NCOIL), a PIA-backed model bill regulating certificates of insurance is now seeing action in at least seven states.

A bill has been introduced in the New Jersey State Assembly that would ban changes to certificate forms, and would assert that certificates are not insurance policies and don’t provide different or extra coverage than the policy does. Assemblyman Gary S. Schaer (D-District 36), who chairs the New Jersey Assembly Committee on Financial Institutions and Insurance, introduced the bill (A-3731), which is expected to be considered at a meeting in the near future.

PIA of New Jersey has been seeking Schaer’s support and presented this model legislation to him. PIA National President Andrew C. Harris, a New Jersey agent, was instrumental at NCOIL meetings in winning approval of the model and will play an integral role in helping pass legislation in New Jersey.

New Jersey is one of at least four states to draft legislation based on the NCOIL model; the others are Indiana, Wisconsin and New Mexico.

In Wisconsin, state representative and PIA member Mary Czaja plans to introduce legislation based on the NCOIL model.

In New Mexico, State Senator Carroll Leavell (NM) was President of NCOIL during much of the time the certificates model was debated; he introduced the model legislation in New Mexico.

In Indiana, another NCOIL legislator who helped craft the model, Representative Matt Lehman, introduced legislation based on the NCOIL language.

In addition, several other states are reporting that they may also take a look at certificates legislation during their upcoming legislative sessions, including Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee.

Filed under: