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Above-Average 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season Predicted

NOAA forecasts that the Atlantic hurricane season in 2017 will be above average with 11 to 17 named storms.
May 31, 2017

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) forecasts that the Atlantic hurricane season in 2017 will be above average with 11 to 17 named storms. The forecasters said the above-average season is due, in part, to fading odds than an El Niño will form in the Pacific.

Five to nine of the named storms will reach hurricane strength with winds of 74 miles per hour, and two to four may become major systems reaching Category 3 or stronger. An estimated $28.3 trillion worth of homes, businesses, and infrastructure is vulnerable to hurricane strikes in the 18 U.S. Atlantic coastal states, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

READ: Hurricane Season Starts June 1 – Get Ready!

The United States has not been struck by a major system since Hurricane Wilma in 2005, said Dennis Feltgen, spokesperson for the U.S. National Hurricane Center. An average hurricane season produces about 12 storms, and in 2016, 15 of the 10 to 16 storms predicted formed during the season. Separately, the United States also predicted 14 to 20 named storms would form in the eastern Pacific, mainly off Mexico.

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