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Atlantic Storm Forecast Raised Again

Forecasters have again increased the number of predicted storms for the Atlantic hurricane season.
August 8, 2017

Due to an absence of El Niño, Colorado State University forecasters have increased the number of predicted storms for the Atlantic hurricane season, with as many as 16 named storms expected this year. Of those, eight could become hurricanes and three major systems with winds of 111 miles (179 kilometers) per hour or more.

“Overall, conditions are more conducive than not for a more active season,” said Phil Klotzbach, lead author of the report. Without an El Niño in the Pacific, wind shear across the Atlantic that can tear apart tropical storms and hurricanes will not be as severe, he said. As a result, storms fueled by abnormally warm water in the Atlantic may have more time to develop and strengthen.

The forecast for storm activity has inched up from 11 in April, 14 in June, and 15 last month, mainly because an El Niño that can dampen Atlantic systems has failed to emerge in the Pacific. The basin produces 12 named storms in an average season, with the most powerful ones usually forming between Aug. 20 and the start of October.

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